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Conference Abstracts

By clicking on the link below you will be able to access the pdf file "LabPhon11.pdf" which containts the entire set of 85 two-page abstracts for the conference. (Note: invited speakers were not required to submit an abstract.) The "bookmarks" tab in the pdf file will give you access to an alphabetical index, by author lastname for all authors (i.e. including all authors of multiple authored papers). The entire file is quite large, and you may want to download it for your own future reference. The individual authors are listed alphabetically below, with their paper titles.

LabPhon11.pdf


Alphabetical list by author surname (all authors included)
  • Frans ADRIAANS
    • Learning Phonotactic Generalizations from Continuous Speech: A Computational Study
  • Eleonora ALBANO
    • Morphological And Phonetic Factors In Brazilian Portuguese Lexical Phonotactics
  • Azra ALI
    • Gradience in Morphological Binding: Evidence from Perception of Audiovisually Incongruent Speech
    • Experiments on Fine Phonetic Detail of Arabic Syllable Structure
  • Jalal AL-TAMIMI
    • Phonetic Cues to Gemination in Lebanese Arabic
  • Attila ANDICS
    • Plasticity in voice category learning
  • Arto ANTTILA
    • The Gradient Phonotactics of English CVC Syllables
  • Mark ANTONIOU
    • Greek-Australian bilinguals match the VOTs of Greek and Australian English native speakers depending on language context
  • Molly BABEL
    • Accessing psycho-acoustic perception and language-specific perception with speech sounds
  • William BADECKER
    • Front/Back Asymmetries in Height Harmony
  • Winifred BAUER
    • Ka conversion – the changing sound and rhythm of Māori?
  • Stefan BAUMANN
    • Articulatory Marking of Focus in German
  • Johannes BECKER
    • Articulatory Marking of Focus in German
  • Mary BECKMAN
    • Generalizing over Lexicons to Predict Consonant Mastery
    • Adult Acoustics and Developmental Patterns for Gender-marked Phonetic Variants in Mandarin Fricatives and Japanese Stops
  • Catherine BEST
    • Greek-Australian bilinguals match the VOTs of Greek and Australian English native speakers depending on language context
    • Distribution of tongue tip articulations in Hindi versus English and the acquisition of stop place categories
  • Natalie BOLL-AVETISYAN
    • Identity Avoidance Between Non-Adjacent Consonants in Artificial Language Segmentation
  • Ivana BRASILEIRO
    • The Perception of a Vowel Contrast by Bilingual Children
  • Maria BREA-SPAHN
    • Metalinguistic judgments of phonotactics by bilinguals
  • Susanne BROUWER
    • How Acoustically Reduced Forms Activate the Lexicon: Evidence from Eye-tracking
  • Jason BROWN
    • Gradient phonotactics in the Gitksan lexicon
  • Marc BRYSBAERT
    • Can auditory distractors disrupt speech execution?
  • Dani BYRD
    • The Scope of Phrasal Lengthening in Articulation: Prosody and Prominence
  • Basilio CALDERONE
    • Recovering morphology from local phonotactic constraints
  • Chiara CELATA
    • Recovering morphology from local phonotactic constraints
  • Della CHAMBLESS
    • The independence of auditory and categorical effects on speech perception
  • Cynthia CLOPPER
    • Lexical Bias in Cross-Dialect Word Recognition in Noise
  • Abigail COHN
    • The Internal Structure of Nasal-Stop Sequences: Evidence from Austronesian
  • Jennifer COLE
    • Frequency and repetition effects outweigh phonetic detail in prominence perception
  • Felicity COX
    • Nasalization of /æ/ and sound change in Australian English
  • Mariapaola D'IMPERIO
    • Phonetic variation and phonological phrasing: does the Accentual Phrase exist in Italian?
  • Olga DMITRIEVA
    • The Gradient Phonotactics of English CVC Syllables
  • Gerard DOCHERTY
    • Perceptual evaluation of sociophonetic variability: how do listeners learn?
    • An investigation of cross-language differences in pitch range for speakers of English and German
  • Grzegorz DOGIL
    • Subglottal Resonances and Vowel Formant Variability: A Case Study of High German Monophthongs and Swabian Diphthongs
  • Katie DRAGER
    • Sensitivity to Grammatical and Sociophonetic Variability in Perception
  • Jan EDWARDS
    • Generalizing over Lexicons to Predict Consonant Mastery
    • Adult Acoustics and Developmental Patterns for Gender-marked Phonetic Variants in Mandarin Fricatives and Japanese Stops
  • Mirjam ERNESTUS
    • How Acoustically Reduced Forms Activate the Lexicon: Evidence from Eye-tracking
  • Carsten EULITZ
    • Experimental approaches to lexical representations of tone in Swedish: What is stored and how does it affect lexical word access?
  • Verena FELDER
    • : What is stored and how does it affect lexical word access?
  • Sara FINLEY
    • Front/Back Asymmetries in Height Harmony
  • Paul FOULKES
    • Exploring social-indexical knowledge: a long past but a short history
    • Perceptual evaluation of sociophonetic variability: how do listeners learn?
  • Carol FOWLER
    • Compensation for Coarticulation may reflect gestural perception: Evidence from a critical examination of the effects of non-speech contexts on speech categorization
  • Stefan FRISCH
    • Metalinguistic judgments of phonotactics by bilinguals
  • Adamantios GAFOS
    • Obligatory release and stiffness modulation in Moroccan Arabic
  • Chip GERFEN
    • The time course of stress and syllable-level encoding: Evidence from a delayed naming task in Spanish
  • Andy GIBSON
    • Perception of Sung and Spoken Vowels in New Zealand English
  • Louis GOLDSTEIN
    • Distribution of tongue tip articulations in Hindi versus English and the acquisition of stop place categories
  • Izabelle GRENON
    • That elusive rhythm: Pros and cons of rhythm metrics
  • Martine GRICE
    • Articulatory Marking of Focus in German
  • Nicolas GUTIERREZ PALMA
    • The time course of stress and syllable-level encoding: Evidence from a delayed naming task in Spanish
  • Gregory GUY
    • Phonological, lexical, and frequency factors in coronal stop deletion in early New Zealand English
  • Kathleen Currie HALL
    • Phonological Relationships: Beyond Contrast and Allophony
    • Bringing Semantics to Sociophonetics: Social Variables and Secondary Entailments
  • Gunnar HANSSON
    • Gradient phonotactics in the Gitksan lexicon
  • Ray HARLOW
    • Ka conversion – the changing sound and rhythm of Māori?
  • Mark HASEGAWA-JOHNSON
    • Frequency and repetition effects outweigh phonetic detail in prominence perception
  • Sarah HAWKINS
    • Syllabifications of the /st/ cluster and vowel-to-vowel coarticulation in English
  • Jen HAY
    • Phonological, lexical, and frequency factors in coronal stop deletion in early New Zealand English
  • Anne HERMES
    • Articulatory Marking of Focus in German
  • Ivan HERREROS
    • Recovering morphology from local phonotactic constraints
  • Sophie HOLMES
    • Phonological learning based on interactive and mediated speech
  • Phil HOOLE
    • Obligatory release and stiffness modulation in Moroccan Arabic
  • John HOUDE
    • Compensation ?=? Mental Representation
  • Fang HU
    • When Ongoing Historical Sound Change Meets with Social Factors
  • Hsiao-Han HUANG
    • Lexical Tonal Space and Sandhi Rule
  • Michael INGLEBY
    • Experiments on Fine Phonetic Detail of Arabic Syllable Structure
    • Gradience in Morphological Binding: Evidence from Perception of Audiovisually Incongruent Speech
  • Keith JOHNSON
    • Accessing psycho-acoustic perception and language-specific perception with speech sounds
  • Elisabet JOENSSON-STEINER
    • Experimental approaches to lexical representations of tone in Swedish: What is stored and how does it affect lexical word access?
  • Baris KABAK
    • Listeners Use Vowel Harmony and Word-Final Stress to Spot Nonsense Words: A Study of Turkish and French
  • Rene KAGER
    • Identity Avoidance Between Non-Adjacent Consonants in Artificial Language Segmentation
  • Evia KAINADA
    • Influence of Prosodic Phrasing on Stop Voicing and Vowel Hiatus Resolution in Modern Greek
  • Eden KAISER
    • Social Selectivity in Adults' Novel Sound Learning
  • Vsevolod KAPATSINSKI
    • The role of phonetic detail in associating phonological units
    • Rule Reliability and Productivity: Velar Palatalization in Russian and Artificial Grammar
  • Shira KATSEFF
    • Compensation ?=? Mental Representation
  • Shigeto KAWAHARA
    • The independence of auditory and categorical effects on speech perception
  • Nina KAZANINA
    • Listeners Use Vowel Harmony and Word-Final Stress to Spot Nonsense Words: A Study of Turkish and French
  • Peter KEEGAN
    • Ka conversion – the changing sound and rhythm of Māori?
  • Michael KEY
    • Interactive and autonomous modes of speech perception: Phonological knowledge and discrimination in English and French listeners
    • The independence of auditory and categorical effects on speech perception
  • Ghada KHATTAB
    • Phonetic Cues to Gemination in Lebanese Arabic
  • Jeanette KING
    • Ka conversion – the changing sound and rhythm of Māori?
  • John KINGSTON
    • The independence of auditory and categorical effects on speech perception
  • Naoko KINOSHITA
    • The acquisition of lexical rhythm and duration by Japanese second language learners
  • Eunjong KONG
    • Adult Acoustics and Developmental Patterns for Gender-marked Phonetic Variants in Mandarin Fricatives and Japanese Stops
  • Christian KROOS
    • Greek-Australian bilinguals match the VOTs of Greek and Australian English native speakers depending on language context
  • Manisha KULTHRESHTHA
    • Distribution of tongue tip articulations in Hindi versus English and the acquisition of stop place categories
  • Aditi LAHIRI
    • An investigation of unaspirated dental and retroflex stops in Bangla
    • Experimental approaches to lexical representations of tone in Swedish: What is stored and how does it affect lexical word access?
    • Harmful Reduction?
  • Christian LANGSTROF
    • Perceptual evaluation of sociophonetic variability: how do listeners learn?
  • Eleanor LAWSON
    • Having your cake and eating it: An articulatory perspective on the individual’s place in systems of variation and change
  • Chia-Chien LEE
    • Lexical Tonal Space and Sandhi Rule
  • Yunwei LEE
    • Phonetic Details and Lexical Idiosyncrasies in Vowel Categorization in Taiwanese
  • Fangfang LI
    • Adult Acoustics and Developmental Patterns for Gender-marked Phonetic Variants in Mandarin Fricatives and Japanese Stops
  • Pi-Chiang LI
    • Lexical Tonal Space and Sandhi Rule
  • Deborah LOAKES
    • Phonetic Evidence for Neutralisation of Prelateral /ae/ and /e/ in Melbourne English
  • Steven LULICH
    • Subglottal Resonances and Vowel Formant Variability: A Case Study of High German Monophthongs and Swabian Diphthongs
  • James McQUEEN
    • Plasticity in voice category learning
  • Sara MACK
    • A sociophonetic analysis of perception of sexual orientation in Puerto Rican Spanish
  • Margaret MACLAGAN
    • Ka conversion – the changing sound and rhythm of Māori?
  • Ian MADDIESON
    • Segmentation, not just similarity: alliteration as a natural experiment
  • Andreas MADSACK
    • Subglottal Resonances and Vowel Formant Variability: A Case Study of High German Monophthongs and Swabian Diphthongs
  • Katalin MADY
    • Heads you lose: prosodic structure and timing in Hungarian
  • James MAGNUSON
    • Compensation for Coarticulation may reflect gestural perception: Evidence from a critical examination of the effects of non-speech contexts on speech categorization
  • Kazumi MANIWA
    • Listeners Use Vowel Harmony and Word-Final Stress to Spot Nonsense Words: A Study of Turkish and French
  • Sven MATTYS
    • That elusive rhythm: Pros and cons of rhythm metrics
  • Ineke MENNEN
    • An investigation of cross-language differences in pitch range for speakers of English and German
  • Holger MITTERER
    • How Acoustically Reduced Forms Activate the Lexicon: Evidence from Eye-tracking
  • Yoonsook MO
    • Frequency and repetition effects outweigh phonetic detail in prominence perception
  • Bernd MOEBIUS
    • Detailed Phonetic Memory for Multi-Word and Part-Word Sequences
  • Peggy MOK
    • Syllabifications of the /st/ cluster and vowel-to-vowel coarticulation in English
  • Christine MOOSHAMMER
    • Intrinsic Pitch is not a universal phenomenon: Evidence from Romance languages
  • Rebecca MORLEY
    • Integrating Sub-phonemic Cues: learning across a morpheme boundary
  • Doris MUECKE
    • Articulatory Marking of Focus in German
  • Benjamin MUNSON
    • Social Selectivity in Adults' Novel Sound Learning
    • Bringing Semantics to Sociophonetics: Social Variables and Secondary Entailments
  • Naomi NAGY
    • Perceptual Frequency and Formant Frequency in R speech
  • Hosung NAM
    • Distribution of tongue tip articulations in Hindi versus English and the acquisition of stop place categories
  • Partha NIYOGI
    • When does variation lead to change? A dynamical systems model of a stress shift in English
  • Naomi OGASAWARA
    • Does what listeners hear affect what they say? Evidence from shadowing experiment
  • John OHALA
    • Voicing control and nasalization
  • Carla ORELLANA
    • Metalinguistic judgments of phonotactics by bilinguals
  • Sallyanne PALETHORPE
    • Nasalization of /æ/ and sound change in Australian English
  • Ho-Hsien PAN
    • Lexical Tonal Space and Sandhi Rule
  • Daniel PAPE
    • Intrinsic Pitch is not a universal phenomenon: Evidence from Romance languages
  • Caterine PETRONE
    • Phonetic variation and phonological phrasing: does the Accentual Phrase exist in Italian?
  • Nicolai PHARAO
    • Frequency of use and the Apparent Time Paradigm
  • Janet PIERREHUMBERT
    • Lexical Bias in Cross-Dialect Word Recognition in Noise
  • David PISONI
    • The role of phonetic detail in associating phonological units
  • Kathy RASTLE
    • Can auditory distractors disrupt speech execution?
  • Henning REETZ
    • An investigation of unaspirated dental and retroflex stops in Bangla
    • Harmful Reduction?
  • Daylen RIGGS
    • The Scope of Phrasal Lengthening in Articulation: Prosody and Prominence
  • Anastasia RIEHL
    • The Internal Structure of Nasal-Stop Sequences: Evidence from Austronesian
  • Kevin ROON
    • Obligatory release and stiffness modulation in Moroccan Arabic
  • Leslie ROOT
    • Distribution of tongue tip articulations in Hindi versus English and the acquisition of stop place categories
  • Felix SCHAEFFLER
    • An investigation of cross-language differences in pitch range for speakers of English and German
  • Jim SCOBBIE
    • Having your cake and eating it: An articulatory perspective on the individual’s place in systems of variation and change
  • Michael SHELTON
    • The time course of stress and syllable-level encoding: Evidence from a delayed naming task in Spanish
  • Chris SHEPPARD
    • The acquisition of lexical rhythm and duration by Japanese second language learners
  • Ryan SHOSTED
    • The Acoustics of Voiceless Nasal Vowels
  • E. Alleyn SMITH
    • Bringing Semantics to Sociophonetics: Social Variables and Secondary Entailments
  • Caroline SMITH
    • Phrasing not duration differs in French questions and statements
  • Rachel SMITH
    • Phonological learning based on interactive and mediated speech
  • Paul SMOLENSKY
    • Replicator dynamics of speech perception and categorization
  • Maria-Josep SOLE
    • Voicing control and nasalization
  • Morgan SONDEREGGER
    • When does variation lead to change? A dynamical systems model of a stress shift in English
  • Mee SONU
    • Vowel length effects on the perception of geminate and singleton stop boundaries by Korean learners of Japanese
  • Shari SPEER
    • Processing lexical tone in third-tone sandhi
  • Lorenzo SPREAFICO
    • Phonetic variation of /r/ in a language contact context: The case of South Tyrol Italian
  • Ronald SPROUSE
    • Voicing control and nasalization
  • Jane STUART-SMITH
    • Phonological learning based on interactive and mediated speech
    • Having your cake and eating it: An articulatory perspective on the individual’s place in systems of variation and change
  • Anita SZAKAY
    • Suprasegmentals and Ethnic Stereotypes in New Zealand
  • Marija TABAIN
    • An EPG study of palatal consonants in Arrernte
  • Terrin TAMATI
    • Lexical Bias in Cross-Dialect Word Recognition in Noise
  • Phillip TIPTON
    • Here, [ðe:] and everywhere: lexical access, usage and the retrieval of non nonlinguistic
  • Jane TSAY
    • Phonetic Details and Lexical Idiosyncrasies in Vowel Categorization in Taiwanese
  • Hui-ying TSOU
    • Lexical Tonal Space and Sandhi Rule
  • Michael TYLER
    • Greek-Australian bilinguals match the VOTs of Greek and Australian English native speakers depending on language context
  • Akira UTSUGI
    • Ongoing merger of lexical tonal classes in Masan/Changwon Korean: Evidence from lexical and postlexical/intonational phenomena
  • Alessandro VIETTI
    • Phonetic variation of /r/ in a language contact context: The case of South Tyrol Italian
  • Navin VISWANATHAN
    • Compensation for Coarticulation may reflect gestural perception: Evidence from a critical examination of the effects of non-speech contexts on speech categorization
  • Travis WADE
    • Detailed Phonetic Memory for Multi-Word and Part-Word Sequences
  • Abby WALKER
    • Phonetic information affects grammaticality judgements
    • Phonological, lexical, and frequency factors in coronal stop deletion in early New Zealand English
  • Mary Ann WALTER
    • Vowel Cooccurrence in the Lexicon: An Anti-OCP Effect?
  • Qian WANG
    • Do Chinese learners of English make use of fine phonetic details as English speakers do when perceiving the English lexical stress?
  • Sarah WATSKY
    • The independence of auditory and categorical effects on speech perception
  • Catherine WATSON
    • Ka conversion – the changing sound and rhythm of Māori?
  • Laurence WHITE
    • Heads you lose: prosodic structure and timing in Hungarian
    • That elusive rhythm: Pros and cons of rhythm metrics
  • Lukas WIGET
    • That elusive rhythm: Pros and cons of rhythm metrics
  • Colin WILSON
    • Replicator dynamics of speech perception and categorization
  • Wolfgang WOKUREK
    • Subglottal Resonances and Vowel Formant Variability: A Case Study of High German Monophthongs and Swabian Diphthongs
  • Michael WOLMETZ
    • Replicator dynamics of speech perception and categorization
  • Lei XU
    • Processing lexical tone in third-tone sandhi
  • Tae-Jin YOON
    • Do Chinese learners of English make use of fine phonetic details as English speakers do when perceiving the English lexical stress?
  • Ivan YUEN
    • Can auditory distractors disrupt speech execution?
  • Chakir ZEROUAL
    • Obligatory release and stiffness modulation in Moroccan Arabic
  • Frank ZIMMERER
    • Harmful Reduction?




   
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Updated: 13 March, 2012     © 2007 Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand